Category Archives: Snowdonia Walks

The Nant Gwernol Trailways

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Nant Gwernol Station

Nant Gwernol is a rocky river gorge high above the Talyllyn Valley and offers a couple of walks steeped in the history of the Welsh slate industry. The Cascade Trail is a one mile circular walk starting at the Nant Gwernol Station which follows the riverside and offers picturesque views of a series of falls and the surrounding forest.
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Fairbourne’s Blue Lake

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The Blue Lake

**** UPDATE  21/05/2019 The entrance to the Blue Lake has been blocked – the dragon’s nostrils.  You can still do the climb but you cannot now swim in the lake. ****

The Blue Lake occupies high ground in the old Goleuwern Slate Quarry above Fairbourne and is one of Snowdonia’s secret gems. Whilst most of our attractions are well sign-posted, the Blue Lake is hidden away without even a sign at the start of the path which leads to the lake.  All you get is a fairly nondescript public right-of-way sign; that’s it.  I know people who have been coming to this part of Wales for 20-years and did not even know it existed.  It’s not surprising that the Blue Lake has found its way on to the BBC’s Secret Britain, especially when the Welsh tourist board merely hint at its existence.  Have a look for yourself at how VisitWales leave you hanging.
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Cadair Idris – Snowdonia’s second favourite mountain peak

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Cadair_idris_thumbnail

Cadair Idris is Wales’ second most popular mountain (after Snowdon) and is just a few miles north-east of Tywyn in the south-west corner of Snowdonia. The mountain is a collection of three peaks which are said to form the “chair of Idris”. The peaks are Pen y Gadair, which forms the head of the chair; Cyfrwy, the saddle; and Mynydd Moel, the bare mountain. Welsh mythology has it that this “chair” was used by Idris the giant when contemplating the heavens. Alternatively, the mountain may have been named after Idris ap Gwyddno, a 7th-century Meirionnydd prince, who defeated the Irish in battle on the mountain. This feat may have been sufficiently noteworthy to elevate Idris’ status to that of a ‘giant’ amongst men leading to his immortalisation as the giant of Cadair Idris. As an aside, Idris was the son of Gwyddno who many have linked with Gwyddno Granhir, ruler of the submerged hundred.

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Dolgoch Falls

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Dolgoch Falls

Dolgoch Falls are three waterfalls forming part of the Nant Dol-góch stream, a source for the River Fathew, and are just 4-miles from the beaches of Tywyn and the Trem Enlli Self-Catering Apartment.

The waterfalls provide the backdrop to a popular walk of no more than one mile and there is plenty of space for children to run around without getting into too much mischief. There are caves and tunnels to explore as well. Take a picnic and a towel as there are delightful pools at the top of the falls to cool your feet. However, if you are visiting with children, keep a watchful eye for any meddling water-loving fairies as many have been caught in the act of carrying-off unguarded children.

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Snowdonia Car-free Holiday – Tywyn/Aberdyfi Beach Walk – Day Five

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Tywyn-Aberdyfi Beach Walk

In the first blog in this series, we got you to Tywyn. In the second, we visited the historic Harlech Castle. In the third, we spent a day with the Talyllyn Railway and in the fourth, we visited the mysterious Portmeirion village and gardens. Our penultimate blog saw us visit the Centre for Alternative Technology. In this final blog, we are going on a beach-walk to Aberdyfi.

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